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History and Facts of South Carolina Counties

Today’s South Carolina counties did not always exist in the present form. They went through many different changes in the space of a few short years.

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6 List of Old South Carolina Districts

South Carolina Counties

In 1629, King of England Charles I chartered the Province of Carolina, an area covering what is now South and North Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee. The charter was unrealized and ruled invalid.

Province of Carolina Counties (1663-1712)

On March 24, 1663 The Province of Carolina (aka the South Carolina Colony) was chartered by Charles II to a group of eight English noblemen.

Proprietary Counties

In 1682, after the first hard years of settlement, the Proprietors ordered three counties laid out. The original proprietary counties created were Berkley, Colleton and Craven.

Later, a fourth county, Carteret County (renamed Granville County in 1708), was laid out between the Combahee and the Savannah rivers.

These South Carolina counties were created for geographical reference only. They didn’t keep any records. They were used as reference points for land grants, and used to determine militia duty.

Province of South Carolina (1712-1776)

The division of the Carolina Province into North Carolina and South Carolina became complete in 1712.

Until 1716, they were also used for the purposes of determining elected representatives. In 1769, circuit court districts took priority over proprietary counties for judicial purposes and all South Carolina counties were discontinued.

However, the counties were still used as reference points on maps and grant-like documents until they were completely replaced by other counties in 1785.

Church Act of 1706

The Church of England became the official church supported by South Carolina in 1706  and also created 10 parishes to carry out the church’s work.

In 1716, those parishes were also used for the purpose of determining elected representatives. Besides serving as election districts, parishes recorded vital statistics, cared for the poor and orphans, provided doctors, and operated free schools.

In 1770 there were 24 parishes, of which only three were in the backcountry.

1731 Township Act

The provincial (royal) government created several acts. One of its acts was the 1731 Township Act.

In 1761, authorization was given to create more townships. Eleven townships of 20,000 acres apiece were created by the act. Families from Europe were recruited by agents to come and settle in the newly created townships.

Free transportation, free land, free provisions for a year, and other incentives were offered to get European families to come to South Carolina and settle. No records were created by the townships at all.

However, townships were used in order to locate conveyances and grants. They were also occasionally used as tax districts.

Circuit Court Districts, 1769-1784

On July 29, 1769, 7 judicial districts of created by South Carolina’s colonial General Assembly that incorporated all the settled area of the colony. These districts were:

  1. Georgetown District
  2. Charleston District
  3. Beaufort District
  4. Cheraws District
  5. Camden District
  6. Orangeburg District
  7. Ninety-Six District

These districts brought some legal services to the backcountry but did not supply all the benefits of the parishes.

Around 1772, they began holding actual court proceedings. In 1791, Washington and Pinckney districts were added.

Districts and Counties (1785-1800)

In 1785, the originally 7 districts were divided Forty into 33 counties.

  • Beaufort District – Granville, Hilton, Lincoln, and Shrewsbury counties (counties never became functional, and were abolished in 1798).
  • Charleston District – Bartholomew, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Marion, and Washington counties (counties never became functional, and were abolished in 1791).
  • Camden District – York, Chester, Fairfield, Lancaster, Richland, Claremont, and Clarendon counties. In 1791, Kershaw County was formed from portions of Claremont, Lancaster, Fairfield, and Richland counties.
  • Cheraws District – Chesterfield, Marlboro, and Darlington counties. In 1791, Salem County was formed from portions of Claremont and Clarendon counties.
  • Georgetown DistrictKingston (1801 renamed Horry County), Liberty (1798 renamed Marion County), Williamsburg and Winyah County (1800 renamed Georgetown County) counties (counties never became functional, and were abolished in 1798).
  • Ninety-Six District – Spartanburg, Union, Laurens, Newberry, Abbeville, and Edgefield counties
  • Orangeburg District – Orange, Lewisburg, Lexington, and Winton counties.

Some South Carolina counties established interior courts at that point, and then they began keeping local records.

County government formation was temporarily put off in Georgetown, Charleston, and Beaufort. They never functioned as counties at all. It is also worth noting that, between the years of 1791 and 1799, the court system in 3 of the 4 counties in Orangeburgh District did not function either.

It’s important to note that both the district seats and the county seats existed for an overlapping time period and each of them could perform actions on a local level.

State of South Carolina Counties

The State of South Carolina entered the union as the 8th state on May 23, 1788.

Districts, 1800-1814

In 1800, most of the 37 counties and 9 court districts were all combined into 25 districts. Washington, Pinckney Ninety-Six, Camden, and the Cheraws districts vanished, and the counties they had encompassed became districts.

Claremont, Clarendon, and Salem counties became Sumter District. Lexington District was formed from Orangeburg with roughly the same territory as the old county of the same name.

Marion District was formed from part of Georgetown, Colleton District from part of Charleston, and Barnwell District from part of Orangeburg. Georgetown yielded Horry District in 1801 and Williamsburg District in 1804.

In some cases, the borders of the new districts lined up with borders of districts that were created from 1785 to 1799.

Each of the 25 districts had the power of the highest local government level. They each kept records equally and had an equal status level.

From 1800 to 1867, the districts were divided and some of them were expanded, eventually creating 30 different districts.

In 1826, Pendleton was divided into the two districts of Pickens and Anderson. In 1855, Clarendon District was taken from Sumter with the same boundaries as the old Clarendon County of 1785.

South Carolina Counties (1868-1870)

The the state Constitution of 1868 stated that

“the Judicial Districts shall hereafter be designated as Counties”

and abolished the parishes and designated judicial districts formally as counties and formed Oconee County from the western part of Pickens..

South Carolina Counties Today

Today, South Carolina is divided into 46 counties. States bordering South Carolina are Georgia and North Carolina.

Each county serves as the local level of government within its borders.

There are some South Carolina counties that no longer exist because they were discontinued, renamed or merged with another county. These are important for genealogy research purposes.

Fun Facts about South Carolina Counties

Counties by Year

  • Berkley, Colleton, and Craven Counties was the original 3 counties created on May 10, 1862.
  • Allendale County was the last county created on February 6, 1919.

County Size Facts

County Population Facts

South Carolina City Facts

South Carolina’s 10  largest cities (2010) are:

  1. Columbia (129,272) is in Lexington and Richland counties
  2. Charleston (120,083) is in Berkeley and Charleston counties
  3. North Charleston (97,471) is in Berkeley, Dorchester and Charleston counties
  4. Rock Hill (66,154) is in York County
  5. Greenville (58,409) is in Greenville County
  6. Sumter (40,524) is in Sumter County
  7. Florence (37,056) is in Florence County
  8. Spartanburg (37,013) is in Spartanburg County
  9. Goose Creek (35,938) is in Berkeley and Charleston counties
  10. Aiken (29,524) is in Aiken County

Boundary Changes of South Carolina Counties from 1747 to 1987

This Interactive Map of South Carolina Counties  show the historical boundaries, names, organization, and attachments of every county, extinct county and unsuccessful county proposal from the creation of South Carolina from 1747-1987.

List of South Carolina Counties

List of Old Former / Extinct South Carolina Counties

Some South Carolina counties that were established by South Carolina law no longer exist. These defunct counties were either

  1. Judicial counties
  2. Counties established by legislative act but never organized and later abolished by legislative act
  3. Counties established outside the present boundaries of South Carolina
  4. Counties whose names have been changed.

The below South Carolina counties no longer exist:

Bartholomew County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Charleston DistrictBartholomew County was effectively eliminated as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

Berkeley County, Province of Carolina

Created on March 12, 1682 created as one of three original counties.

On November 30, 1706, Christ Church, St. Andrew, St. James-Goose Creek, St. John-Berkeley, St. Philip, and St. Thomas / St. Dennis Parishes created within Berkeley County.

Berkeley County was effectively eliminated when 7 original judicial districts created on July 29, 1769.

Berkeley County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1682 within the Charleston DistrictBerkeley County was effectively eliminated as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

Carteret County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1684  from unorganized Colonial land areas. In 1708 Carteret County was renamed to Granville County (Original).

The Carteret County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat. In this case the term “county” had no meaning other than to describe an approximate geographical area.

Charleston County (Original), South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Charleston DistrictCharleston County was effectively eliminated as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

Claremont County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Camden DistrictClaremont County became part of newly created Sumter District on January 1, 1800.

Claremont County was effectively eliminated as a unit of local government.

Colleton County, Province of Carolina

Created on May 10, 1682 created as one of three original counties.

On November 30, 1706, St. Bartholomew and St. Paul Parishes created within Colleton County.

Colleton County was effectively eliminated when 7 original judicial districts created on July 29, 1769.

Colleton County (Second), South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Charleston DistrictColleton County was effectively eliminated as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

Craven County, Province of Carolina

Created on March 12, 1682 created as one of three original counties.

On November 30, 1706, St. James-Santee Parish created within Craven County.

Craven County was effectively eliminated when 7 original judicial districts created on July 29, 1769.

Granville County (Original), Province of Carolina

Created in 1708 when Carteret County was renamed to Granville County.

On June 7, 1712, St. Helena Parish created within Granville County. Also later Prince William Parish (1745), St. Peter Parish (1747) and St. Luke Parish (1767) were created within Granville County

Granville County was effectively eliminated when 7 original judicial districts created on July 29, 1769.

Granville County (Second), South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Beaufort DistrictGranville County was abolished as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Granville County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Hilton County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Beaufort DistrictHilton County was abolished as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Hilton County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Kingston County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Georgetown DistrictKingston County was abolished as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Kingston County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Lewisburg County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Orangeburg DistrictLewisburg County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Lewisburg County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Liberty County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Georgetown DistrictLiberty County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Liberty County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Lincoln County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Beaufort DistrictLincoln County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Lincoln County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Marion County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Charleston DistrictMarion County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Marion County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Orange County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within the Orangeburg DistrictOrange County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Orange County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Pendleton County, South Carolina

Created on March 7, 1789 from former Cherokee and Creek lands. Attathed to attached to Abbeville County.

Pendleton County was abolished as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system and became part of newly created Washington District on February 19, 1791.

Re-Created on January 1, 1800 from Washington District, with same boundaries as Pendleton County.

On December 20, 1826 from Pendleton County was divided into Anderson and Pickens counties and Pendleton County ceased to exist.

Salem County, South Carolina

Created on December 21, 1792 from  Clarendon and Claremont counties.

On January 1, 1800, Salem County combined with the remains of Clarendon and Claremont counties to form the new Sumter District, effectively eliminating Salem County as a unit of local government

Shrewsbury County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within Beaufort DistrictShrewsbury County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Shrewsbury County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Washington County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within Charleston  DistrictWashington County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Washington County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Williamsburg County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within Georgetown DistrictWilliamsburg County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Williamsburg County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

In 1804 Williamsburg District would be created with the same boundaries as Williamsburg County in 1785, and in 1868 when all the judicial districts were eliminated the same area would become Williamsburg County.

Winton County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within Orangeburg DistrictWinton County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Winton County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

Winyah County, South Carolina

Created on March 12, 1785 within Georgetown DistrictWinyah County was abolished  as county administrative unity by reform of judicial district system on February 19, 1791.

The Winyah County government never became functional. Most records were kept at the parish level; none were kept at the county level. There was no county seat.

List of Old South Carolina Districts

Between January 1, 1800 and April 16, 1868, judicial districts were the principal administrative subdivisions of the state, while counties survived mostly as geographical references.

The below South Carolina districts no longer exist:

Abbeville District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800  from Ninety-Six District , with same boundaries as Abbeville County.

Anderson District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868. Abbeville County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Anderson District, South Carolina

Created on December 20, 1826  from Pendleton District , with same boundaries as Anderson CountyAll Saints Parish creation disallowed by Crown in London and reverted to Prince George-Winyaw Parish.

Abbeville District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868. Anderson County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Barnwell District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800  from Orangeburg DistrictBarnwell District was eliminated, became Barnwell County when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868. Barnwell County assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Beaufort District, Province of South Carolina

Created on July 29, 1769 as one of seven original judicial districts. Beaufort District encompassed all or parts of 3 parishes: St. Luke, St. Helena, and St. Peter.

On March 12, 1785, Granville, Hilton, Lincoln, and Shrewsbury Counties created within Beaufort District.

On February 19, 1791, Granville, Hilton, Lincoln, and Shrewsbury Counties effectively eliminated as county administrative units by reform of judicial district system.

Beaufort District was eliminated, became Beaufort County when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Beaufort County assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Camden District, Province of South Carolina

Created on July 29, 1769 as one of seven original judicial districts. Camden District encompassed most of St. Mark Parish.

On March 12, 1785, Chester, Claremont, Clarendon, Fairfield, Lancaster, Richland and York Counties created within Camden District.

On January 1, 1800, Camden District was eliminated, and was divided into Fairfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, and Sumter Districts.

Charleston District, Province of South Carolina

Created on July 29, 1769 as one of seven original judicial districts. Beaufort District encompassed all or parts of 15 parishes: St. Andrew, St. Bartholomew, Christ Church, Prince George-Winyaw, St. George, St. James Goose-Creek, St. James-Santee, St. John-Berkeley, St. John-Colleton, St. Mathew, St. Michael, St. Philip, St. Stephen, and St. Thomas / St. Dennis.

On March 12, 1785, Bartholomew, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Marion, and Washington counties created within Charleston District.

On February 19, 1791,Bartholomew, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Marion, and Washington counties effectively eliminated as county administrative units by reform of judicial district system.

Charleston District was eliminated, became Charleston County when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Charleston County assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Cheraws District, Province of South Carolina

Created on July 29, 1769 as one of seven original judicial districts. Camden District encompassed all or part of 2 parishes: St. David, and St. Mark.

On March 12, 1785, Chesterfield, Marlboro, and Darlington Counties created within Cheraws District.

On January 1, 1800, Camden District was eliminated, and was divided into Chesterfield, Marlboro, and Darlington Districts.

Chester District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800  from Pinckney District, with same boundaries as Chester County.

Chester District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Chester County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Clarendon District, South Carolina

Created on January 5, 1857 created from Sumter District, with same boundaries as the original Clarendon County of 1785.

Chester District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Clarendon County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Colleton District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800  from Charleston District. Colleton District was eliminated, became Colleton County when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Colleton County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Darlington District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Cheraws District, with same boundaries as Darlington County.

Darlington District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Darlington County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Edgefield District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Cheraws District, with same boundaries as Edgefield County.

Edgefield District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Edgefield County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Fairfield District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Cheraws District, with same boundaries as Fairfield County.

Fairfield District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Fairfield County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Georgetown District, Province of South Carolina

Created on July 29, 1769 as one of seven original judicial districts. Georgetown District encompassed all or parts of 3 parishes: All Saints, Prince George-Winyaw, and Prince Frederick..

On March 12, 1785, Kingston (1801 renamed Horry County), Liberty (1798 renamed Marion County), Williamsburg and Winyah (1800 renamed Georgetown County) counties created within Georgetown District.

On February 19, 1791, Kingston, Liberty, Williamsburg and Winyah counties effectively eliminated as county administrative units by reform of judicial district system.

On January 1, 1800, Georgetown District was eliminated, became Georgetown County when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts.

Georgetown County assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Greenville District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Ninety-Six and Washington Districts, with same boundaries as Greenville County.

Greenville District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Greenville County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Horry District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Georgetown District, with same boundaries as the old Kingston County.

Horry District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Horry County and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Kershaw District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Camden District, with same boundaries as Kershaw County.

Kershaw District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Kershaw County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Lancaster District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Camden District, with same boundaries as Lancaster County.

Lancaster District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Lancaster County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Laurens District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Camden District, with same boundaries as Laurens County.

Laurens District was eliminated when the new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Laurens County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Lexington District, South Carolina

Created on December 21, 1804 from Orangeburg District, with altered 1803 Lexington County boundaries.

Lexington District was eliminated, and became Lexington County when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Lexington County assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Marion District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Georgetown District, with same boundaries as Old Liberty County.

Marion District was eliminated, became Marion County when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Marion County assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Marlboro District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Cheraws District, with same boundaries as Marlboro County.

Marion District was eliminated when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Marlboro County continued  and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Newberry District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Cheraws District, with same boundaries as Newberry County.

Newberry District was eliminated when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Newberry County continued  and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Ninety-Six District, Province of South Carolina

Created on July 29, 1769 as one of seven original judicial districts.

On March 12, 1785, Spartanburg, Union, Laurens, Abbeville, and Edgefield counties created within Ninety-Six District. Newberry County created within parts of Ninety-Six and Orangeburg Districts.

On January 1, 1800, Ninety-Six District was eliminated and divided into Abbeville, Edgefield, Greenville, Laurens, and Newberry Districts.

Oconee District, South Carolina

Created on January 29, 1868  from Pickens District, with same boundaries as Oconee County, by ordinance of the state constitutional convention of 1868.

Oconee District was eliminated when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Oconee County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Orangeburg District, Province of South Carolina

Created on July 29, 1769 as one of seven original judicial districts. Orangeburg District encompassed parts of 2 parishes: Prince William, and St. Mathew.

On March 12, 1785, Orange, Lewisburg, Lexington, and Winton counties created within Orangeburg District.

On February 19, 1791, Orange, Lewisburg, Lexington, and Winton counties effectively eliminated as county administrative units by reform of judicial district system.

Orangeburg District was eliminated, became Orangeburg County when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts.

Orangeburg County assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes. on April 16, 1868.

Pendleton District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Washington District, with same boundaries as Pendleton County.

Pendleton District was eliminated and divided into Anderson District, and Pickens District on December 20, 1826.

Pickens District, South Carolina

Created on December 20, 1826  from Pendleton District, with same boundaries as Pickens County.

Pickens District was eliminated when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Pickens County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Pinckney District, South Carolina

Created on February 19, 1791 from Camden and Ninety-Six Districts. Pinckney District was abolished and divided into Chester, Spartanburg, Union and York Districts on January 1, 1800.

Richland District, South Carolina

Created on December 18, 1799 from Camden District, with same boundaries as Richland County.

Richland District was eliminated when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Richland County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Spartanburg District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Ninety-Six District, with same boundaries as Spartanburg County.

Spartanburg District was eliminated when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Spartanburg County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Sumter District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Camden District, encompassing Claremont, Clarendon, and Salem Counties; Claremont and Salem counties were effectively eliminated as units of local government.

Sumter District was eliminated, became Sumter County when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Sumter County assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Union District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Pinckney District, with same boundaries as Union County.

Union District was eliminated when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

Union County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

Washington District, South Carolina

Created on February 19, 1791 former Cherokee and Creek lands. Washington District was abolished and divided into Greenville and Pendleton Districts on January 1, 1800.

Williamsburg District, South Carolina

Created on December 21, 1804 from Georgetown District, with same boundaries as Williamsburg County in 1785.

Williamsburg District was abolished, became Williamsburg County when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts.

Williamsburg County assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

York District, South Carolina

Created on January 1, 1800 from Pinckney District, with same boundaries as York County.

York District was eliminated when new state constitution abolished all judicial districts on April 16, 1868.

York County continued and assumed all functions of local government from both judicial districts and parishes.

List of Old South Carolina Parishes

The below South Carolina parishes no longer exist:

All Saints Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on December 19, 1770  from Prince George-Winyaw Parish within Craven CountyAll Saints Parish creation disallowed by Crown in London and reverted to Prince George-Winyaw Parish.

Re-Created on March 16, 1778  from Prince George-Winyaw ParishAll Saints Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

Christ Church Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706  within Berkley County. Christ Church Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

Orange Parish, Province of South Carolina

Created on March 16, 1778  within Orangeburg District. Orange Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

Prince Frederick Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on April 9, 1734 from Prince George-Winyaw Parish within Craven County. Prince Frederick Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

Prince George-Winyaw Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on March 10, 1722 from the northwest part of St. James Santee Parish with in Craven County and unorganized colonial land. Prince George-Winyaw Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

Prince William Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on May 25, 1745 from St. Helena Parish with in Granville County and unorganized colonial land. Prince William Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Andrew Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706 from within Berkley CountySt. Andrew Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Bartholomew Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706 from within Collenton CountySt. Bartholomew Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. David Parish, Province of South Carolina

Created on April 12, 1768 from Prince Frederick and St. Mark Parishes within Craven CountySt. David Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. George-Dorchester Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on December 11, 1717 from St. Andrew Parish within Berkley CountySt. George-Dorchester Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Helena Parish, Province of South Carolina

Created on June 7, 1712 from within Granville CountySt. Helena Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. James-Goose Creek Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706 within Berkley CountySt. James-Goose Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. James-Santee Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706 within Craven CountySt. James-Santee Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. John-Berkeley Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706 within Berkley CountySt. John-Berkeley Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. John-Colleton Parish, Province of South Carolina

Created on April 9, 1734 from St. Paul Parish within Colleton CountySt. John-Colleton Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Luke Parish , Province of South Carolina

Created on May 23, 1767 from St. Helena Parish within Colleton CountySt. Luke Parish creation disallowed by Crown in London and reverted to St. Helena Parish.

Re-Created on June 3, 1790  from St. Helena Parish.  St. Luke Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Mark Parish, Province of South Carolina

Created on April 9, 1734 from Prince Frederick Parish within Craven CountySt. Mark Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Matthew Parish, Province of South Carolina

Created on August 9, 1765 within Berkley County. St. Matthew Parish creation disallowed by Crown in London and reverted to non-parish status.

Re-Created on June 20 1768  within Berkley CountySt. Matthew Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Michael Parish, Province of South Carolina

Created on June 14, 1751 from St. Philip Parish within Berkley CountySt. Michael Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Paul Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706 within Colleton CountySt. Paul Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Peter Parish, Province of South Carolina

Created on February 17, 1747 from St. Helena Parish within Granville CountySt. Peter Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Philip Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706  within Berkley CountySt. Philip Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Stephen Parish, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706 from St. Stephen Parish within Craven CountySt. Stephen Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.

St. Thomas / St. Dennis Parishes, Province of Carolina

Created on November 30, 1706 within Berkley County. Although created as separate parishes, the boundary separating St. Thomas and St. Dennis was never clearly defined and by 1720 they were functioning as a single parish.

St. Thomas / St. Dennis Parish  effectively eliminated as a governmental unit by state constitution on September 27, 1865.